British Tech Institute BCS Swallows IMIS

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IMIS joins BCS to promote the profession of IT

Members of the Institute for the Management of Information Systems (IMIS), an international non-profit organisation headquartered in the UK and devoted to support and promotion of the IT profession, have voted to merge with the Chartered Institute for IT (BCS), a larger professional body that serves the same function.

The merger has gone into immediate effect, with all professional IMIS members automatically joining the BCS.

The two organisations will work together to maintain standards and improve the image of the industry, hoping to place careers in information technology alongside the respected professions of law and engineering.

Strength in numbers

Since the 1960s, IMIS, a registered charity, has been working to promote  understanding of information systems management, to enhance the status of those engaged in it, and to promote higher standards through education and training. It has approximately 12,000 members, most of them based outside the UK.

iT Professional, Data Centre © Arjuna Kodisinghe, Shutterstock 2012BCS, founded in 1957 as the British Computer Society and currently under the patronage of the Duke of Kent, is a charity that brings together industry, academics and government to share knowledge, promote new thinking, inform the design of new curricula, shape public policy and inform the public. It has over 70,000 members around the world. The addition of IMIS members is expected to help BCS increase its influence on policy decisions.

“We are delighted to welcome IMIS into the BCS group. This is a natural fit and reinforces both of our agendas to promote and represent the IT profession across the globe,” said BCS Group chief executive David Clarke.

“Today IT is central to society and business, therefore it is important that we establish standards for those currently working in the profession, encourage the next generation to consider IT as a future career choice and raise awareness among the general public of the importance of the profession.”

“We believe that together our organisations will offer the best opportunity for members to continue to meet their academic, professional and career requirements. This is a landmark event for the industry,” added Professor Simon Rogerson, chair of IMIS Council.

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