EE Offers Broadband To Other Networks’ Customers At No Extra Charge

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The UK’s largest mobile network operator joins the unbundled broadband game

EE, known primarily as the largest mobile network operator in the UK, has started offering its broadband services to customers without a mobile contract, at no additional charge.

This puts it in a competition against traditional Internet Service Providers (ISPs) such as BT, Sky and Virgin Media.

New customers can now get the basic 17Mbps service for just £2.50 a month for the first year, plus the phone line rental charges of £15.75 per month. Non-EE customers previously had to pay a £10 per month premium if they wanted to be connected to the operator’s broadband network.

More competition

EE (formerly Everything Everywhere) was created after the merger of Orange and T-Mobile brands in 2010. It was the first operator to offer 4G connectivity in the UK, and recently said it hopes to have six million 4G customers by the end of the year.

router internet DSL SOHO gateway broadband © Ensuper ShutterstockThe company was recently named the country’s best mobile operator by the independent research firm RootMetrics.

EE used to sell its broadband services as part of mobile contracts, along with landline calls. From this week, it is also offering broadband separately. Discounted fibre connections are also available, with 38Mbps speeds available at just £5 a month for the first three months and £19.95 per month thereafter.

The company’s most expensive broadband package includes 76Mbps connectivity, unlimited landline calls, 1,000 mobile minutes and international calls, all for £20 per month for the first three months and £34.95 after.

In order to encourage new customers, EE will pay up to £100 to cover the cost of their existing contracts as long as they switch to EE.

Earlier this month, the Advertising Standards Agency banned the company from making claims it offered the ‘best broadband in Britain’. The agency ruled that a 2013 Ofcom report into fixed-line broadband performance could not serve to substantiate such claims.

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