Anonymous Targets EDL After Woolwich Unrest

Tom Brewster is TechWeek Europe's Security Correspondent. He has also been named BT Information Security Journalist of the Year in 2012 and 2013.

The EDL is targeted by hackers again over its reaction to the murder of soldier Lee Rigby

Hacktivist collective Anonymous has turned its attention to the English Defence League (EDL), after the latter’s protests following the death of a soldier in Woolwich.

The anti-Islamic political protest group took to the streets after the murder of soldier Lee Rigby, which was allegedly carried out by Islamic extremists. Islam groups have condemned the killing, saying it was anti-Islamic.

Anonymous © Rob Kints Shutterstock 2012But Muslims and members of the EDL clashed during a protest and counter-demonstration in London. Four have now been charged.

The UK branch of Anonymous has shown its opposition to the EDL by releasing what it claims are the names and contact details of EDL members.

EDL a target

In a message announcing OpEDL, Anonymous UK accused the organisation of “indoctrinating our young with your criminal mindset”.

“You have capitalized [sic] on the misfortunes of our peoples, taking advantage of moments of fear, of terror, and of reconciliation, to spread hatred and animosity towards your fellow man,” the message read.

“Your constant belligerence, like a pack of raving ignoramuses, furthering only bigotry and segregation. You have angered us considerably, and summoned our wrath irrevocably.

“Under the guise of national pride you have instigated crimes against the innocent and incited the subjugation of Muslims.”

Anonymous promised to”begin the systematic and comprehensive desiccation” of the “cult”.

Not all branches of Anonymous appear to be wholly supportive of OpEDL, however. Anonymous Operations told TechWeekEurope over Twitter: “Since we are decentralised we do not agree on all the Anon operations. OpEDL is limiting freedom of speech no matter what their beliefs are.”

And on Pastebin, Anonymous UK has been accused of rehashing old stolen data from another hacking crew, TeamPoison, but making it appear new by simple re-formatting.

One OpEDL Twitter account had already been suspended as of this morning, but another promised the operation was not over.

Hacker groups have targeted EDL before. In 2010, a group called the Mujahideen Hacking Unit got its hands on hundreds of names and addresses of EDL members.

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