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Oracle And Fujitsu Strike Japanese Cloud Deal

Ben covers web and technology giants such as Google, Amazon, and Microsoft and their impact on the cloud computing industry, whilst also writing about data centre players and their increasing importance in Europe. He also covers future technologies such as drones, aerospace, science, and the effect of technology on the environment.

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Oracle to dish out cloud services from Fujitsu’s Japanese data centres

Fujitsu and Oracle have entered a partnership to sell cloud computing services to Japanese businesses and their global subsidiaries.

Oracle’s cloud products, such as its Database Cloud and Human Capital Management Cloud will be hosted on Fujitsu’s Japanese data centres, with Fujitsu taking on sales duty.

Oracle said that by bringing its cloud services to customers through Fujitsu’s ‘Cloud Service K5’, it can meet the needs of its business customers in the country.

HCM Cloud

The first Oracle Cloud Application that will be offered to Fujitsu customers under the joint offering is Oracle HCM Cloud.

Japan © Maxx-Studio Maxx-Studio Shutterstock 2012“We at Fujitsu support the digital transformation of our customers, and aim to contribute to optimized customer systems and business growth with the roll out of our Digital Business Platform MetaArc,” said Shingo Kagawa, head of Digital Services Business & CTO, Fujitsu Limited.

“In particular, we offer the core cloud service on MetaArc, K5, which addresses systems of engagement (SoE)(*1) and systems of record (SoR)(*2). Oracle is a leader in Japan’s database market segment and possesses strong capabilities in the SoR domain. Now, as we look to strengthen MetaArc and K5, taking part in this strategic alliance with Oracle will work to meet the cloud needs of our customers.”

Last month, strong sales in the cloud department did not stop Oracle’s revenue falling one percent as the software vendor reported its fourth quarter results.

In the quarter ending May 31, Oracle’s profits hit $2.81 billion (£2bn), up from $2.76 billion in the same quarter a year ago. But total revenue dropped one percent, down to $10.59 billion (£7.42bn).

Revenues from Oracle’s cloud division rocketed almost 50 percent in the quarter to $859 million (£602m), the company reported.

Specifically, Oracle’s SaaS and PaaS divisions hit growth of 66 percent year-over-year, with cloud infrastructure revenue growing five percent.

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