eCommerceEnterpriseFinancial MarketsMarketingMobilitySoftwareWorkspace

O2 Customers Can Now Add iTunes Purchases To Their Bills

Michael Moore joined TechWeek Europe in January 2014 as a trainee before graduating to Reporter later that year. He covers a wide range of topics, including but not limited to mobile devices, wearable tech, the Internet of Things, and financial technology.

Follow on: Google +

Any iTunes Codes will be included in monthly costs

Music fans with an O2 mobile contract will now be able to pay for their iTunes purchases through one bill following a new partnership revealed by the operator.

From today, O2 customers will now be able to purchase iTunes Codes and charge them directly to their monthly mobile phone bill, or take it out of their Pay & Go phone credit. The codes can then be used to redeem music, apps, games, books, TV series, movies and more directly from the iTunes Store, App Store, iBooks and Mac App Store.

O2 has signed up managed service providers epay and Touchtechmedia along with mobile payments company Boku, which works with the likes of Facebook, EA and Spotify, to power the new capability, part of its Charge to Mobile service.

o2-logo-square-largeGrowing fast

“We look forward to making our customers’ lives easier by offering them a fast, easy and safe alternative method of payment to purchase iTunes credit,” said Danny Barclay, O2’s head of commerce sales.

O2 originally introduced Charge to Mobile in 2012, and has since signed up over 100 merchants in the UK using the company’s online and mobile channels. It has attracted over 100 million transactions since launch.

To celebrate the launch, for two weeks, O2 will also be offering customers who purchase iTunes Codes through direct carrier billing, a voucher worth £25 for £20.

The operator has been building its 4G customer base in recent months, announcing earlier this year that it had attracted more than one million 4G customers since it launched its LTE network last August.

These users, including the subscribers to a new public sector 4G network, consumed more data than the first six months after 4G went live than all of its customers combined between 2000 and 2008.

Are you up to speed on 4G? Try our quiz!