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iOS 6.1 Security Flaw Bypasses iPhone Lock Screen

Steve McCaskill is editor of TechWeekEurope and ChannelBiz. He joined as a reporter in 2011 and covers all areas of IT, with a particular interest in telecommunications, mobile and networking, along with sports technology.

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Hacker posts video of how to get around PIN number on iOS 6.1 lock screen

Apple could be about to face further headaches from iOS 6.1 after a video was posted on YouTube outlining how security on the iPhone lock screen can be easily bypassed by just about anyone, rendering it vulnerable to hackers.

Currently, users must enter a four-digit PIN number to gain access to their iPhone, but the hack, posted by a user known as ‘VideosdeBarraquito’, outlines how to circumvent this a few taps of the screen.

The video has now been viewed by more than 300,000 people.

iPhone lock screen security flaw

iphone mapsTo exploit the loophole, users must cancel an emergency call before performing a number of button presses which should trick the device into keeping the ‘phone’ application on the device open. It appears as though the presses must be accurately executed, but if successful will allow the hacker to make phone calls, view call records and other information such as contact details.

Earlier this week, Apple filed a patent application outlining an image-based unlocking system that could be used in future iPhones and iPads, but presumably this would be vulnerable to the same flaw unless it was fixed in a future update.

Apple had not responded to requests for comment at the time of publication, but is unlikely to be happy by the prospect of yet another setback to the latest version of its mobile operating system.

Vodafone customers in the UK reported 3G connection difficulties after upgrading, causing the operator to recommend that its customers not download the update until Apple had fixed the problem, which it duly did with the release of iOS 6.1.1.

Apple has also said that it is working on a solution to a bug that has caused problems with Microsoft Exchange 2010 servers. Users attempting to fetch emails or update their calendars on their newly-updated iPhones and iPads caused log files to swell and CPU and RAM usage on servers running Exchange to spike, severely degrading performance.

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