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Intel Announces Micro Wrist Computer And Gender Equality Campaign

Ben covers web and technology giants such as Google, Amazon, and Microsoft and their impact on the cloud computing industry, whilst also writing about data centre players and their increasing importance in Europe. He also covers future technologies such as drones, aerospace, science, and the effect of technology on the environment.

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Announcements at CES 2015 keynote show Intel’s 2020 vision

Intel flashed new wearable gadgets at CES 2015 this week, with CEO Brian Krzanich showing off a drone that can be worn on the wrist and an open source microcomputer the size of a button.

Krzanich also used the stage to announce a $300m, five-year investment into mathematics education and programs to help women and minorities find employment in technology.

Real problems

“The rise of new personal computing experiences, intelligent and connected devices, and the wearable revolution are redefining the relationship between consumers and technology,” said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO.

Krzanich said Intel wants to solve “real problems”, and in order to do that, the firm “must also do more to lead the growth of diversity and inclusion within the technology industry”.

“Women and under-represented minorities will continue to play a greater role as consumers, influencers, creators and leaders,” said Krzanich.

The pledge follows controversy last year when Intel pulled its advertising from gaming industry website Gamasutra. The site published articles critical of the Gamergate movement, a movement which is fighting alleged bias in video game journalism, but which has largely been labelled as a sexist movement following threats from its proponents against female video game developers and journalists.

Intel pulled its ads from Gamasutra after an email campaign by Gamergate advocates. The firm then faced gender inequality from critics of the movement.

Intel
Intel Curie module – button-sized prototype

In 2013, only a quarter of Intel’s US employees were women, and just 12 percent Hispanic or African American.

Speaking on the pledge, Krzanich said: “We’re calling on our industry to again make the seemingly impossible possible by making a commitment to real change and clarity in our goals.”

“Without a workforce that more closely mirrors the population, we are missing opportunities, including not understanding and designing for our own customers.”