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CES 2015 – Intel Takes Wraps Off Fifth Generation ‘Broadwell’ PC Chips

Michael Moore joined TechWeek Europe in January 2014 as a trainee before graduating to Reporter later that year. He covers a wide range of topics, including but not limited to mobile devices, wearable tech, the Internet of Things, and financial technology.

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Say hello to the processor that will power the next generation of PCs, Ultrabooks and Chromebooks

Intel has finally revealed the PC version of its Broadwell processor to the world at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) today, taking the wraps off what will ultimately be the brains of many future computers.

Originally scheduled for release before Christmas, Broadwell was shown off as part of Intel’s push at the Las Vegas show, and the chip should be coming to notebooks, 2 in 1s, Ultrabook devices, Chromebooks, All-In-One desktop PCs and mini PCs.

The fifth generation of Intel Core i3, i5 and i7 chips are already scheduled to appear in a host of big-name devices, including several announced or displayed at CES, including Acer’s first-ever 15.6in Chromebook (pictured below) and Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Carbon.

Chromebook 15_top coverNext-gen

The new chips are built on Intel’s 14nm manufacturing process, which the company says will provide major improvements in graphics, performance and battery life. This includes up to 24 percent better graphics performance, up to 50 percent faster video conversion and battery life that is up to 1.5 hours longer than the last series of processors.

They will also facilitate much better graphics performance thanks to DirectX 12 being fully integrated, and 4K resolution even in Wireless Display mode as well as improved sound thanks to Intel’s smart sound technology.

But Intel says the new chips will also include the opportunity for more interactive services via its RealSense technology meaning that tools such as gesture control, voice assistance and wireless displays could soon be commonplace for many PCs.

The release comes several months after Broadwell first appeared in its less powerful mobile handset guise last autumn. Officially named the Core M, the chip was the first to reach mass manufacturing using a 14-nm process, Intel said.

Alongside the PC chip launch today, Intel also began shipping its next generation 14nm processor for tablets, codenamed “Cherry Trail”. This new system on a chip will offer new user experiences such as Intel’s RealSense and Context Aware technology, which it hopes will widen the horizons for tablet users. New products based on “Cherry Trail” will be introduced starting in the first half of 2015.

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