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HP Sure Click Aims To Isolate Malware Lurking On Unknown Websites

As News Editor of Silicon UK, Roland keeps a keen eye on the daily tech news coverage for the site, while also focusing on stories around cyber security, public sector IT, innovation, AI, and gadgets.

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Working with Bromium, HP Inc has created a tool that protects laptops from browser malware by using virtual machines

HP Inc has moved to tackle accidental malware downloads by joining forces with security firm Bromium to create a tool for its enterprise grade laptops which isolates unsecured websites.

HP Sure Click creates a virtual machine each time a user visits a new website, which isolates the activity within the browser tab from the machine it is running on and any other tabs open at the same time in the browser.

Essentially, this creates a containment zone to prevent any malware that an unknown webpage may be hiding from infecting the computer being used to visit it, defending against malicious code injection and phishing attacks.

HP Sure Click

virtualmachines“By partnering with Bromium to create HP Sure Click, we provide exclusive hardware-enforced security for web browsers as a standard feature, giving both users and businesses the freedom to browse confidently,” said Alex Cho, general manager of Commercial PCs, Personal Systems at HP Inc.

HP Sure Click will make its debut as a web download this spring on the HP EliteBook x360 1030 G2 and will work with Internet Explore and the open-source version of Google’s Chrome browser, Chromium.

HP Inc noted that the motivation behind HP Sure Click was down to an increasing number of IT security managers citing unsecure web browsers as a primary attack vector that they need to protect their organisations against.

Part of this rise in such attacks comes from malware and cyber attacks becoming ever-more sophisticated that they become difficult to spot even by security savvy people.

Finding way to tackle such threats is on the agenda of most IT firms, with IBM taking its Watson cognitive computing technology and working it into a platform designed to crunch through data to spot cyber threats and find ways to defend against them.

Companies like Darktrace are also using similar artificial intelligence-based security technology to block attacks by automated systems.

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