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BBC Will Broadcast Rio 2016 Olympic Games In 360 Degree Video

Steve McCaskill is editor of TechWeekEurope and ChannelBiz. He joined as a reporter in 2011 and covers all areas of IT, with a particular interest in telecommunications, mobile and networking, along with sports technology.

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BBC experiments with VR and 360 degree video for Rio 2016 Olympics and will broadcast one live event a day on BBC Sport 360

BBC will broadcast at least one live event per day from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in 360 degree video on PC, iOS, android and Samsung Gear VR.

The opening and closing ceremonies will be covered, as will beach volleyball, boxing, gymnastics, fencing, athletics, basketball and diving.

Up to 100 live hours a day will be broadcast and a daily highlights show will also be available on the ‘BBC Taster’ website for PC and a dedicated mobile application.

BBC Sport 360 Rio 2016

brazil sao paolo cristo redentor telefonica © Mark Schwettmann shutterstock_73059592The Olympic broadcaster promises the ‘BBC Sport 360’ application will give viewers a closer view on the games, which start on 5 August.

“The BBC delivered the first truly digital Olympics for London 2012 and we’ve continued to develop and improve our digital service ever since,” said Jusin Barritt, executive product manager for BBC Sport.

“Now, we’re pushing the boundaries once again to bring people closer to the action than ever before. Not everyone can make it to Rio to cheer on Team GB so we’re looking forward to giving sport fans the next best thing.”

The BBC trialled 360 degree video at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow two years ago, where it also tested 4K ‘Ultra HD’ transmissions and LTE broadcasts.

“This is a hugely exciting next step in our 360 and virtual reality experiments,” added Will Saunders, editorial lead of BBC Taster. “There’s huge potential for immersive video in sport coverage, as well as many other genres, and we want to explore that potential directly with audiences.

“That’s why we experiment out in the open, so people can tell us what works, what doesn’t and whether there’s an appetite for more. We can’t wait to hear what people think.”

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