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Early Android Adopters Find Sour Centre In Lollipop

Michael Moore joined TechWeek Europe in January 2014 as a trainee before graduating to Reporter later that year. He covers a wide range of topics, including but not limited to mobile devices, wearable tech, the Internet of Things, and financial technology.

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Latest update is already being rolled out across select Android devices

Android fans are reporting a variety of issues when upgrading to the latest version of the software.

Google’s product forums are being swamped with users complaining that Android 5.0, otherwise known as Lollipop, fails to work properly on their devices, particularly both iterations of the Nexus 7 tablet.

The complaints range from repeated crashes to slow running to failing audio, with some users saying that their devices had been rendered ‘unusable’ since upgrading.

Some users are also reporting that Lollipop appears to remove apps built with Adobe Air, and then prevents them from being reinstalled, although Adobe says it has now raised the issue with Google.

The firm has now released any statement regarding the issues.

Google Nexus Android LollipopThis sucks

“We were previously unaware of this bug and contrary to other reports, were not working with Google on a fix,” Adobe product manager Chris Campbell wrote in response to user complaints.

“However, we are working with Google on another self-signed certificate issue that is impacting in-app purchases. It’s possible the two are related, but we do not have enough information at this time to determine one way or the other.

“That said, we’ll be escalating this issue with Google immediately.”

In response to the issues, a post has been set up explaining how to restore devices back to the previous version of Android, Android 4.4 KitKat, as according to one user, Lollipop has turned their Nexus 7 into “nothing more than a paperweight.”

Google unveiled Android Lollipop last month alongside its latest smartphone and tablet devices. Android 5.0 offers a wide range of visual and interface improvements alongside a selection of hardware tweaks, and thanks to a new “Material Design” feature will work across the entire range of Android-enabled devices, meaning users get a consistent look and feel whether they’re using a smartphone, tablet or TV.

Currently, only a small number of devices can upgrade to Lollipop, starting with the Nexus family of tablets and smartphones made by Google. However, other manufacturers, including LG and Motorola, have indicated they will make the update available on select devices soon.

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