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Apple Pay Is Going To Disney World

Michael Moore joined TechWeek Europe in January 2014 as a trainee before graduating to Reporter later that year. He covers a wide range of topics, including but not limited to mobile devices, wearable tech, the Internet of Things, and financial technology.

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Apple’s mobile payment service also signs up Ticketmaster to make buying tickets even easier

Visitors to the ‘happiest place on Earth’ will now be able to use their Apple devices to pay for their food and Mickey Mouse ears following the news that Apple Pay is now available at the Walt Disney World resort.

Starting from Christmas Eve, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus (and eventually Apple Watch) users can tap their device to pay at venues including shops, restaurants, bars and ticket sales booths. Venues that currently use portable payment terminals, such as table service restaurants, will be added later

The resort already supports other forms of digital payment, including Google Wallet, with Disneyland itself expected to begin also supporting Apple Pay sometime next year.

Apple PayTickets please

Elsewhere, Apple Pay has also signed up one of the world’s leading ticket sale sites, with Ticketmaster announcing its iOS app will now support the service.

This means that Ticketmaster customers can pay for their tickets using just a single touch using the Touch ID sensor on their device. The new app will work for customers equipped with an iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, as well as iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3.

“We work hard to deliver simple and secure ways for fans to purchase tickets to the events they love, and offering Apple Pay makes our industry-leading app the most convenient, flexible and secure way to buy,” said Jared Smith, president of Ticketmaster North America.

Apple Pay was announced alongside the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus back in September, and signed up a million subscribers in just its first three days of use. The service, which is currently available for use within 90 per cent of shops and banks across the US, looks to replace a customer’s debit or credit card using Near Field Communication (NFC) technology built into the phone.

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