InnovationWearable Tech

Microsoft HoloLens Development Edition Arrives Next Month

Michael Moore joined TechWeek Europe in January 2014 as a trainee before graduating to Reporter later that year. He covers a wide range of topics, including but not limited to mobile devices, wearable tech, the Internet of Things, and financial technology.

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“We’ve made a lot of progress”, Microsoft says as it also reveals the hardware powering HoloLens

Microsoft says its HoloLens device will begin shipping next month.

Successful applicants for the Microsoft HoloLens Development Edition are now being invited to purchase the device, which is set to cost $3,000 when it ships on March 30 in the US and Canada.

Going virtual

Microsoft HoloLensMicrosoft has also revealed details of the hardware that is inside HoloLens, which will be powered by Windows 10, allowing tie-ups with other platforms via the software’s Continuum feature, as well as in-built support for Bluetooth 4.1.

An Intel 32-bit processor will provide the power, alongside a custom-built Microsoft Holographic Processing Unit (HPU) that allows the device to understand gestures and gaze while mapping the world around the user, all in real time.

However, Microsoft was keen to emphasise that HoloLens is “fully untethered and self-contained”, and requires no markers, no external cameras, no wires, no phone required, and no connection to a PC to run.

The company also revealed more details on the display of HoloLens, which consists of see-through holographic lenses. These use an advanced optical projection system to generate multi-dimensional full-colour holograms, which become richer and bigger the more light sources and radiants are detected.

As for sensors, HoloLens contains built-in cameras to record HD pictures and video of the holograms in the world around you that you can share with others even when they don’t have a HoloLens, which Microsoft is calling mixed reality captures (MRC).

“Just over one year ago, we introduced Microsoft HoloLens to the world,” Microsoft’s Alex Kipman wrote in a blog post announcing the news. “It was exciting to see the response to our unveil of the first and only fully untethered holographic computer. We’ve spent the past year focused on connecting with developers and commercial customers to imagine our holographic future together.”

“I’m really excited to start this journey with you,” added Kipman, “This platform was created for you, the dreamers, the creators, the Windows developers.”

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